Android Source Code in Eclipse

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Google made developing an Android app fairly simple. Everything you need can be downloaded for free from Android’s development site. This includes the Android API, an Android emulator (for running Android apps directly on your computer), and an Eclipse plugin called ADT (Android Developer Tools). However, there is was one thing missing: the Java source code.

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Projects in Visual C++ 2010 – Part 1: Creating a DLL project

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When you write software, you often/sometimes divide your project into several subprojects. This mini series describes how to do this with Visual C++ 2010 (but this first part also applies to earlier versions). We start with creating a library project in form of a DLL.

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Projects in Visual C++ 2010 – Part 2: Project Dependencies

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This article is the second part of the subprojects mini series. The first part was about creating a DLL project. This part will show how to use a DLL library project in another project.

Referencing a library in C++ (or, more specific, with Visual C++) is somewhat cumbersome – or should I say, used to be somewhat cumbersome. Fortunately, with the release of Visual C++ 2010 this has been greatly simplified. This article first shows the old way and then describes the new (simple) way.

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Projects in Visual C++ 2010 – Part 3: Precompiled Headers

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In this part of the “Projects in Visual C++ 2010″ mini series another important aspect of C++ programming is explain: precompiled headers. Precompiled headers (or precompiled header files) in many cases significantly reduce the time needed to compile a project.

Here at work I have a C++ project with about 50 .cpp files in it. The project uses the Qt library and all files only include the absolute minimum of header files required. Without precompiled headers, compiling the project takes about 56 seconds. With precompiled headers, the compile time goes down to about 7 seconds. That’s eight times faster.

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Eclipse Plugins

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This is just a note to my self of what Eclipse plugins I’ll use. This list may, however, also be useful to you.

  • Subclipse: Subversion support
  • MercurialEclipse: Mercurial support
  • ExploreFS: This plugin allows you to open a file in Windows Explorer/Finder through the context menu.
  • CheckStyle: This plugins allows you define more precise rules for your code style. If a rule is violated, a warning is issued.
  • TestNG: Unit testing framework (much like JUnit)

To see what plugins have already been installed, go to Help –> Install new software… and click on What is already installed? at the bottom of the dialog.