Updating MAMP

MAMP

Working with MAMP is quite easy. However, the process of updating MAMP to a newer version might contain some uncertainties.

The following table contains things that one want to keep when upgrading to a newer version and whether they’re correctly migrated or not.

What Migrated
server ports (as specified in settings) no (tracked as #4796)
htdocs directory yes (moved)
htdocs location (as specified in settings) no (tracked as #4796)
Databases (db directory) yes (moved)

The process was tested with MAMP 3.0.7.3.

.NET Serializers Comparison Chart

There are many object serializers in C#/.NET but their details are often not so obvious, for example:

  • Does my class need a parameterless constructor?
  • Can I serialize private fields?
  • Can I serialize readonly fields?

So, I’ve compiled a comparison chart in this article that will compare the various serializers and their capabilities.

Read more →

Azure WAT150: This assembly is not in the package.

When publishing to Windows Azure, you may get the warning WAT150:

warning WAT150: The project ‘MyProject’ is dependent on the following assembly: J:\Sources\MyProject\packages\Microsoft.Data.Services.Client.5.6.0\lib\net40\Microsoft.Data.Services.Client.dll. This assembly is not in the package. To make sure that the role starts, add this assembly as a reference to the project and set the Copy Local property to true.

This warnings means that one of your projects uses an assembly that’s installed locally on your computer (e.g. using ASP.NET in a worker role) but is not installed on the Azure instance you want to run the package on. So, usually you can’t ignore this warning as the resulting package won’t run.

The usual fix is to use Nuget packages instead of globally installed assemblies. However, if this doesn’t work (like in my example above where the package clearly comes from Nuget), there’s another culprit:

The Global Assembly Cache (GAC)

Basically, if the referenced assembly is registered in the GAC with exactly the same version, then Visual Studio will always use the assembly from the GAC. Because of this, the assembly won’t be copied to the output directory and thus won’t be in the Azure package – resulting in WAT150 warnings.

This seems to be like this by design. Quoting from MSDN:

If you deploy an application that contains a reference to a custom component that is registered in the GAC, the component will not be deployed with the application, regardless of the CopyLocal setting. In previous versions of Visual Studio, you could set the CopyLocal property on a reference to ensure that the assembly was deployed. Now, you must manually add the assembly to the \Bin folder. This puts all custom code under scrutiny, reducing the risk of publishing custom code with which you are not familiar.

This statements is not entirely correct. Setting CopyLocal to true works – but only for the project directly referencing the assembly. Unfortunately, CopyLocal is not transitive, i.e. if project A references assembly X.dll (registered in the GAC; with CopyLocal set to true) and project B references project A, then X.dll will only appear in the output directory of project A but not in the output directory of project B. (It would appear in the output directory of project B if X.dll wasn’t in the GAC.)

How to fix

There are a couple of ways how to fix this problem, but they all are workarounds:

  • Delete the assembly from the GAC: Navigate to %WINDIR%\Microsoft.NET\assembly\GAC_MSIL and delete the assembly from here. Note though that these assemblies may still be need and some software may stop working.
  • Switch to a different assembly version that’s not in the GAC.
  • Reference the necessary assemblies directly in all role projects.

Bug of the Day: Help Viewer is missing some files

Nice error message, but could you please tell me which content files are missing/corrupted or how to fix this problem?

A content file required by the Help Viewer is missing or has been corrupted.

To fix this problem, I’ve attached the initial contents of the Help Viewer folder to this post.

Just extract to zip file to the local help store path. The path can be found in the registry (value name LocationPath):

  • Visual Studio 2012: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Help\v2.0\Catalogs\VisualStudio11
  • Visual Studio 2013: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Help\v2.1\Catalogs\VisualStudio12

If you can’t find the registry keys here, try HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Help\... (i.e. without the Wow6432Node).

Ping/Identify Computers By Name In Local Network

In a local network (or any other network), it’s desirable to be able to find computers by name rather than by ip address.

So, instead of using:

$ ping 192.168.178.25

one wants to use:

$ ping mycomputer

This mapping task is typically done by a DNS server.

Sometime back I wrote an article about how to ping/identify computers by name on Windows.

Unfortunately this solution highly depends on a good router that

  • lets you specify names for individual ip addresses (or determines them automatically)
  • provides a domain name for your local network (e.g. “fritz.box”)

Unfortunately, I recently was forced to switch to a less “superior” router that doesn’t support these features. So an alternative had to be found.

Multicast DNS

Fortunately, a solution exists and this solution is called Multicast DNS (short: mDNS).

Multicast DNS lets you find computers on your local network by name. You just have to add .local to the computer’s name.

So, to ping a computer called marvin you’d use:

$ ping marvin.local

What Do I Need?

There are two major mDNS implementations: Apple’s Bonjour and Microsoft’s Link-local Multicast Name Resolution (LLMNR).

Bonjour seems to have a wider adoption so I’m concentrating on this.

Here’s what you need:

  • Windows: If you have iTunes installed, you’re ready to go. If you don’t want to install iTunes, you’ll need to install the Bonjour Print Services for Windows. (Don’t be bothered by the “printing” part in the name. The package is a fully functional mDNS solution and it’s the only standalone Bonjour package available for Windows anyway.)
  • Linux: You need Avahi which is compatible with Bonjour. On Ubuntu/Debian, you need two packages: avahi-daemon (to be visible on the network) and libnss-mdns (to be able to find other computers)
  • OS X: Everything is pre-installed. You don’t need anything else.

Notes:

  • The domain .local has officially been reserved for resolving names in a local network. This means that:

    • there will never be a “real” domain ending called “.local”. So you don’t run the risk of name conflicts with the internet.
    • good routers won’t ask your ISP’s DNS server for “.local” names. So connecting to a “.local” name, will always result in an ip address from the local network.
  • mDNS, of course, only works if no two computers on the local network share the same name.
  • With mDNS, you don’t need to specify .local as “primary DNS suffix” on Windows – unlike the solution in the aforementioned article.